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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 10:01 am 
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Panamint Valley Old Timer
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Pete - I think we're gonna get along just fine around the campfire.. I love to talk politics.

I never knew any of that WWII stuff -- England not Being There for Australia, America
stepping in to help, the resentment felt toward England to this day.... Fascinating.



Kit


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 4:46 pm 
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Location: Winnemucca, NV
Gravelrash wrote:
I meant to say there's a touristy/functioning mine in the city of Bendigo by that name and that the city reeks of old gold money! Nice buildings and "feel".

We have "ghost towns" like that also here in the States. Virginia City, Nevada; Deadwood, South Dakota and the like. They were fabulous in their heyday (1800s) but now are little more than tourist towns; heavily slanted toward selling cheap bobbles and trinkets, "antiques" and confectioners sugar treats.

Gravelrash wrote:
... spent the last 5 or 6 weeks exploring all the fantastic ghost towns on their site, "met" David Wright as we shared (my) growing love of Jarbidge ...

I guess you've seen my nearly 1,000 photos I've got on ghosttowns.com. I haven't sent any new ones in years, I've got a ton of new photos of old sites and new photos of sites that aren't on the website yet. It's just a pain to upload photos and navigate large sites like GT.com on dial-up Internet. Now that I don't have it at home, I go to the library 15 miles away and have gotten spoiled with DSL.

You mention your growing love for Jarbidge; you've seen my page on my website on Jarbidge, correct? If not, it's HERE. It's a very large page and I've recently updated it with photos I took this year and expanded the description and photos of the northern access/egress from Jarbidge via Rogerson, Idaho.

Since I don't have Internet at home any longer, I have to send the files via email to my site's host site owner, who uploads the files for me (you need a special program to upload files to the Net, which the library computers don't have). There's about six new photo thumbnails not showing and about half of them I forgot to put in the coding to click and open full size. I sent the missing photos and revised the page, but Jack hasn't responded yet to my email with the files, so I think he's out of town. But Jack will get to it in time.

I also have another page that focuses on my nearly disastrous visit to Jarbidge (had to evacuate Jarbidge in the middle of the night due to a wildfire bearing down on the town - actually driving through the flames as I was driving out into Idaho), as well as the wildfires that nearly torched my house HERE.

And my TRIP 2001 pages cover Jarbidge as well (it's on the 3rd and 4th pages); as well as other Northern Nevada and southwestern Idaho ghost towns.

Gravelrash wrote:
GoogleEarth is my friend!

Yeah, I know what you're talking about. Since I've been using the library computers with DSL, I've gotten hooked on Google Earth. I didn't know until the past two weeks that you can tilt the scene and "fly," which has now caused my eyes to blur and water quite a bit after spending an hour or more "flying" around my neck of the woods whenever I get a chance.

Gravelrash wrote:
Biggest "mountain" nearby is 1,200 metres!!

There are two mountains in sight of my house are both 14,242 feet high (4,341 meters) - North Palisade Peak (Sierra Nevada Range) and White Mountain Peak (White Mountains). Palisade is 12.7 miles southwest of me, White Mountain Peak is about 30 miles north of me. My entire backyard view is dominated by the massive face of the Sierra Nevada. I'm sure by now you've found a few of my photos on this site taken from my back yard, most in the "Early Winter" thread.

As for Death Valley, the highest peak is Telescope Peak, 11,048 feet (3,624 meters), with many peaks on both sides of the valley over 8,000 feet (2,438 meters +).

Gravelrash wrote:
I grew up on a steady diet of Donna Reed, My Three Sons, Leave it to Beaver and Andy Hardy (God I loved Andy Hardy films!), Our Gang etc, but more importantly.... the Westerns! So many, too many to mention, but I spent a lot of time in the old west as a boy!

It's interesting how the US and Australia has shared media stars and heroes. We sent you all the westerns and TV shows; you sent us Paul Hogan as Crocodile Dundee. America was smitten by Hogan. I've seen the first two Dundee films and own both on video tape and watch them from time to time and have a ball each time. The movies really spoof America's love affair with what are stereotypical views of Australia are, yet the movies are humerous and clever enough to come off very well done.

The Outback Steakhouse (I really don't know if this is an actual Australian import or an American knockoff) is very big in California's big cities.

General Motors is now basing a couple of Pontiac models based on your Holden (part of the GM empire).

It's not as big as it was in the 1980s, but the mega-ski resort town of Mammoth Lakes, 58 miles north of me, used to have a substantial Australian population of skiers who'd ski the slopes Down Under during our summer, and spend your summer skiiing Mammoth (I was living in nearby June Lake - north of Mammoth - in those years). Two bars in town were big Aussie hangouts.

Gravelrash wrote:
Vietnam was the crucible for me. I didn't go, as my number didn't come up, but it radicalised all opinion here and I emerged, a few years later, not convinced America was an ogre!
Still don't believe it.

I didn't go to 'Nam either, as my number never came up (but I sure had short fingernails from biting them off during the last five years of the war while I was on draft status 1A but never called). America was polarized by Vietnam during the 1960s and early '70s also. Because of Vietnam, the hippy movement was spawned and some of the best Rock & Roll music. Now many of the most vocal critics back then later and now still embrace what they were the most against - consumerism and commercialism - and are now multi-millionaires and aging "Baby Boomers." Times change. People change. Now many Americans - including the media - juxtapose Vietnam and Iraq and the country is polarized again. But I digress ...

Gravelrash wrote:
... remember 9/11 and who did it.

I certainly remember 9/11. I thought I had lost my wife (she was flying United Airlines Boston to Los Angeles that day, but her plane was the NEXT SCHEDULED PLANE AFTER the second hijacked plane that hit the Trade Center); I thought I had witnessed the death of my wife on live TV. I've been to New York City numerous times (one of the companies that owned the borax plants in Trona was based in the World Trade Center and I went to New York and Manhattan on the company dime a couple times; also going a few times as my wife and I have friends living nearby) and have stood atop the World Trade Center several times and it is beyond the imagination what actually happened there.

Gravelrash wrote:
I actually DO KNOW HOW to relax around a camp-fire, so don't be afraid I'll start spouting politics when we meet up!

That's OK. We're not afraid. Sometimes we get the flames of our campfire raging at 3-alarm status around here at times when politics come up on this board ...

_________________
D.A. Wright
~When You Live in Nevada, "just down the road" is anywhere in the line of sight within the curvature of the earth.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 5:58 pm 
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PSR Fire Marshall
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D.A. Wright wrote:

The Outback Steakhouse (I really don't know if this is an actual Australian import or an American knockoff) is very big in California's big cities.


Hmmm, somehow, the authenticity of Outback Steakhouse ends right after the Fosters on the menu. I've gone a couple of times - not been too impressed. I have had better grub in OZ itself. Kind of put Outback in the same category as Benihana's - not much Japanese there. So, I am guessing that Outback is the US interpretation of OZ food, but they've missed the mark.

David Bricker / SYR


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 3:15 am 
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Another Ballarat Barkeep

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:05 pm
Posts: 68
Location: Churchill, Vic, Australia
Beatty Lady wrote:
Pete - I think we're gonna get along just fine around the campfire.. I love to talk politics.

I never knew any of that WWII stuff -- England not Being There for Australia, America
stepping in to help, the resentment felt toward England to this day.... Fascinating.
Kit


Kit, I have no doubt we'll get on just fine. About the camp-fire - hell, there's at least two nights worth of yarns in me! After that, I'll gracefully and gratefully cede the floor to local knowledge! I am coming there to learn, after all.
Anyways, I only have 3 political issues that light my wick - Islam, Islam and Islam. Strangely, I think these are issues on many American lips too!

The sense of resentment felt towards England is a sort of perpetual background to many things that happen in Australia. Unfortunately, it has become a bit "iconic" and is, therefore, up for hijacking by any and all. A good example of this is our present "Republican movement", which sounds, on the surface, a good idea - overthrow the Monarchy and its effects on us. Good rabble rousing rhetoric, 'cept the British Monarchy have NO influence on anything in Australia these days and haven't since Federation, 1901 - (their presence is all purely figurehead stuff) - but what would happen if those people got their way is a total re-write of our Constitution - something I'd go to war over.
Still, ya never know, we might get a "Second Amendment" out of it, and I'd love that!!!

America has been our solid ally ever since WW2 - a situation that allows me to breathe a little easier every day, the crazier things get around us. I've lived in Asia for 10 years, and my Thai/Indian family are movers and shakers in Thai politics - nothing that happens in Asia gives me any reason to wish an end to our mutual friendship.
When I say, "God bless America", I mean every word.
Anyway, perhaps we shouldn't clog up this Panamint site with Oz/US dialogue? I'd love to talk more, so drop me an email, ok? Here's to good times in Beatty.

b.t.w - I went ghost-towning last weekend! It's worth a Google - Walhalla, Victoria.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2007 4:18 am 
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Another Ballarat Barkeep

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David Wright - of course I know your Jarbidge posts. Every gt-er worth his salt does. I love every post. I don't know if you've ever got any of my messages but they all have the same idea -more, more, more! Got it yet? :lol:
You are Jarbidge - we have to go. End of story.

Quote:
We have "ghost towns" like that also here in the States. Virginia City, Nevada; Deadwood, South Dakota and the like. They were fabulous in their heyday (1800s) but now are little more than tourist towns; heavily slanted toward selling cheap bobbles and trinkets, "antiques" and confectioners sugar treats.


That's a major disappointment even though I sorta guessed it would be like that, but...Deadwood! Damn! The old-timers would probably approve, though. Anything to make a buck. Even Mr Woo's pigs would approve, I reckon. Anyway, I'll be more than happy to sit up in the cemetery over-looking the town, and listen to Wild Bill for a bit.


Quote:
I guess you've seen my nearly 1,000 photos I've got on ghosttowns.com. ..... You mention your growing love for Jarbidge; you've seen my page on my website on Jarbidge, correct?


Of course I have. The fire story was....interesting!! I've lived through similar experiences, so I could really relate. People often think they'd respond well in that sort of situation, but when you wake up at 3 in the morning, disoriented, groggy, grumpy and have all these strangers yelling at you to do things you don't understand....that's a test!!
I loved the priorities of the Jarbidge residents too. Soft, half-melted ice-creams but cold beer. What's not to like about a town like that?

Quote:
Gravelrash wrote: GoogleEarth is my friend!
Yeah, I know what you're talking about ... I didn't know until the past two weeks that you can tilt the scene and "fly," which has now caused my eyes to blur and water quite a bit after spending an hour or more "flying" around my neck of the woods whenever I get a chance.


Isn't that just the best thing since sliced bread! I set all these way-points in the Rockies and go soaring around! I've been up Mt Everest a few times too!

Quote:
There are two mountains in sight of my house are both 14,242 feet high (4,341 meters) - North Palisade Peak (Sierra Nevada Range) and White Mountain Peak (White Mountains). Palisade is 12.7 miles southwest of me, White Mountain Peak is about 30 miles north of me. My entire backyard view is dominated by the massive face of the Sierra Nevada. I'm sure by now you've found a few of my photos on this site taken from my back yard, most in the "Early Winter" thread.
As for Death Valley, the highest peak is Telescope Peak, 11,048 feet (3,624 meters), with many peaks on both sides of the valley over 8,000 feet (2,438 meters +).


No-one likes a show-off, Dave! Don't gloat!


Quote:
It's interesting how the US and Australia has shared media stars and heroes.


Hoges was a massive hit everywhere. I actually saw the first one in Brussels, in French, and I was delighted that the Belgique laughed in all the right places! I think it was a film that hit the "right time- right place" button. What we liked was the way he took the piss out of so many sacred cows, like Aboriginal (Koorie) culture. The "noble savage" shtick gets a good run here! Fact is, very few Aussies know anything about Koorie culture, and truthfully.... it doesn't measure up to the hype. Nothing glamorous about living in the dirt and eating grubs. So many Koories, so much Levi Strauss, beer and Mc Donalds!

We don't have "The Outback Steakhouse" here. Could be an interesting experiment when I get Stateside.
As far as General Motors building a Pontiac based on the Holden ..... buy American steel. (Nah - the Holden is a great outback rig.)

Quote:
It's not as big as it was in the 1980s, but the mega-ski resort town of Mammoth Lakes, 58 miles north of me, used to have a substantial Australian population of skiers


Ah, yes, our most famous export - ski bums! Skiers and ski resort developers are responsible for the desecration of more ghost towns than any other group, don't ya know!

Quote:
Because of Vietnam, the hippy movement was spawned and some of the best Rock & Roll music. Now many of the most vocal critics back then later and now still embrace what they were the most against - consumerism and commercialism - and are now multi-millionaires and aging "Baby Boomers." Times change. People change. Now many Americans - including the media - juxtapose Vietnam and Iraq and the country is polarized again. But I digress ...


Digress all you like, we are on the same page. There has been no music since. "The Boss" has a new album out and he sounds like Hilary Clinton or the Dixie Chicks.

Ho! for Jarbidge! Keep the beer cold.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 2:13 pm 
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Panamint Valley Miner Emeritus

Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 3:00 pm
Posts: 4667
Location: Winnemucca, NV
David_Bricker wrote:
… the authenticity of Outback Steakhouse ends right after the Fosters on the menu. … not been too impressed. … better grub in OZ itself. … I am guessing that Outback is the US interpretation of OZ food, but they've missed the mark.

Kind of figured that. Ah, America's penchant for canned ambience, along with frozen food from everywhere in the world but Oz.

Gravelrash”"David Wright - of course I know your Jarbidge posts.[/quote]
Ok. Thought by your posts that you only knew of my ghosttowns.com Internet presence, but I have far more on my website that might be of interest to you. Feel free to get into the menu and indulge.

[quote="Gravelrash wrote:
I don't know if you've ever got any of my messages but they all have the same idea -more, more, more!

I’m not aware of your messages, you mean private messages? I’m showing none in my inbox over at ghosttowns.com. I’ve seen a few of your posts, the ones that I replied to and then invited you here, but that’s all. I haven’t done a search to find all your posts on GT.com. Since I’m using library computers now, I’ve got a time limit, so generally do a search on posts since my last visit and am selective on what I choose to read instead of reading everything and all.

Gravelrash wrote:
Deadwood! Damn!

Don’t get me wrong, Deadwood is set in beautiful surroundings in the Black Hills country of western South Dakota and extreme western Wyoming. Tall pines, grassy meadows, quaking aspens. I lived there for a couple of years on the Wyoming side of the border between 1985-87. It was then still a working class town (the big gold mine was still in operation) with a numerous amenities for tourists mixed in; but when I revisited it in 1993, Deadwood has been transformed and spruced up to a typical tourist town. Virginia City is much the same – Great Basin country at its finest – sagebrush, mountains and scattered pines. Beautiful, but selling their history with a modern, cheesy commercialistic twist.

Gravelrash wrote:
I loved the priorities of the Jarbidge residents too. Soft, half-melted ice-creams but cold beer. What's not to like about a town like that?

Jarbidge is a great place. But you already knew that!

Gravelrash wrote:
I set all these way-points in the Rockies and go soaring around!

I’ve never yet set waypoints. I just fly by the seat of my pants! Haven’t played around with Google Earth enough yet to know how it all works and all of its features. :fighter

Gravelrash wrote:
Don't gloat!

But that’s half the fun of living here … :yupyup:

[quote=”Gravelrash”]We don't have "The Outback Steakhouse" here. Could be an interesting experiment when I get Stateside.[/quote]
From David Bricker’s experience (I’ve never eaten at one – the closest one is 200 miles away), sounds like it might be best to enjoy small town American cafes and authentic Mexican food in the southwest while you visit.

Gravelrash wrote:
As far as General Motors building a Pontiac based on the Holden ..... buy American steel. (Nah - the Holden is a great outback rig.)

The Pontiac G8 is based upon the largest Holden sedan, the Pontiac GTO I believe is the Holden Commodore(?) with Pontiac front and rear facias.

Gravelrash”""The Boss" has a new album out and he sounds like Hilary Clinton or the Dixie Chicks.[/quote]
:shock: I like Springsteen, but shrieking like a woman with that deep voice? I think I better pass … I think I’d rather listen to a Janice Joplin 45 at 33 1/3rd … :music

[quote="Gravelrash wrote:
Ho! for Jarbidge! Keep the beer cold.

:cheers:

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D.A. Wright
~When You Live in Nevada, "just down the road" is anywhere in the line of sight within the curvature of the earth.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 11:21 pm 
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Another Ballarat Barkeep

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:05 pm
Posts: 68
Location: Churchill, Vic, Australia
Hello David, this having to use public library computers sounds like a bummer. My first amputation was.... dramatic....but if they took my net away, I'd REALLY be ticked off!

Quote:
Ok. Thought by your posts that you only knew of my ghosttowns.com Internet presence
I’m not aware of your messages, you mean private messages?

Sorry, I meant comments/replies. I haven't pm'ed. Yes, I've found your site and really enjoy it. The road trip up 747/748 was almost like driving it myself! I will add my usual caveat - "when I sell the business" - but I'd really enjoy your company up that way. I think the residents should consider voting you as Honarary Mayor, after all the promotion you do, and I could mount a good campaign!

Quote:
the ones that I replied to and then invited you here,

There it is, folks, proof it was David. Can't blame Kit or anyone else. It was D.A Wright. We have it in b/w!

Quote:
Deadwood is set in beautiful surroundings in the Black Hills country of western South Dakota and extreme western Wyoming. Tall pines, grassy meadows, quaking aspens. I lived there for a couple of years on the Wyoming side of the border between 1985-87. It was then still a working class town (the big gold mine was still in operation) with a numerous amenities for tourists mixed in; but when I revisited it in 1993, Deadwood has been transformed and spruced up to a typical tourist town. Virginia City is much the same – Great Basin country at its finest – sagebrush, mountains and scattered pines. Beautiful, but selling their history with a modern, cheesy commercialistic twist.


Ah, well, such is life. But, a question. Is there anywhere you haven't lived? Man, you do get around!

Quote:
sounds like it might be best to enjoy small town American cafes and authentic Mexican food in the southwest while you visit.


That's what I thought. The idea of not having any choice but to eat Mexican food is.....wonderful! I am partial to chillies! One of my dreams is to eat in an old diner, like you see in old American films, and to have a hamburger delievered by a gal on roller skates. I thought this was just a thing of the past, but at gt.com I've met "Old Judge" who invited me along to his local diner for the experience! I'm laughing out loud as I write it.... gonna be like a scene from "American Graffiti".
David (and others) I really appreciate you taking the time to answer my fool questions. America is something I know, but don't know and the responses of people have been brilliant, keeping my hunger levels satisfied until I get there. It's a real pleasure to come here and be amongst friends.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:39 pm 
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Panamint Valley Miner Emeritus

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Location: Winnemucca, NV
Gravelrash wrote:
... but I'd really enjoy your company up that way. [Jarbidge]

I'm sorry, but my vacation next year is already set and doesn't include Jarbidge. My wife got her pick this year. I bet Graham C., my buddy from Australia, would love to accompany you, as he mentioned to me that my trip to Jarbidge this past summer "got his juices flowing" to head back up there again (Graham and I went in 2001). Graham joined this forum the other day, he's Coopcoyote.

Back when I worked in Trona, I worked only six months per year (worked four days on, four off schedule) and had five weeks of vacation per year in addition (that meant I really only worked four months and three weeks per year). But I retired early in 2004 (wife is disabled and needed me in Big Pine instead of 125 miles away in Trona), so I work for a food company as a merchandiser and have to start over with 2-weeks per annum.

Even Graham C. was lamented to me the other day as we've only done three trips this year. Before he moved to Big Pine, he'd set up his big expedition styled 4WD rig in my backyard and we'd ramble about my neck of the woods for days on end. But now he moved here, I changed jobs and only have two days each weekend off. So no time to really get out there and explore and camp like days of old.

Gravelrash wrote:
... But, a question. Is there anywhere you haven't lived? Man, you do get around!

I've only lived in six places in my entire 54 years on this planet, all but Wyoming for more than 5 years and most 15-20 years. Born and raised in the San Bernardino Range foothills in southern California on the desert side; Big Bear Lake, California; June Lake, California; Newcastle, Wyoming; Trona/Ridgecrest, California and Big Pine, California.

Gravelrash wrote:
... One of my dreams is to eat in an old diner, like you see in old American films, and to have a hamburger delievered by a gal on roller skates.

Those type of places are generally long gone from the American scene. Those that are still there are re-creations. I believe there is at least one place in Los Angeles that still is in business after all these years that is still run as though the calendar was still 1950s. In the American midwest, often small towns still have cafes and diners that still have the small table jukeboxes at each table, where you put in your coin and select from a "Rolodex" of song titles. But even these are dying off.

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D.A. Wright
~When You Live in Nevada, "just down the road" is anywhere in the line of sight within the curvature of the earth.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2007 5:43 pm 
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Another Ballarat Barkeep

Joined: Mon Oct 15, 2007 3:05 pm
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Location: Churchill, Vic, Australia
D.A. Wright wrote:
Those type of places are generally long gone from the American scene. Those that are still there are re-creations. I believe there is at least one place in Los Angeles that still is in business after all these years that is still run as though the calendar was still 1950s. In the American midwest, often small towns still have cafes and diners that still have the small table jukeboxes at each table, where you put in your coin and select from a "Rolodex" of song titles. But even these are dying off.


David, I'd figured that was the case. It's just an idle fantasy - not that important. The mountains - now that IS important!
(I wouldn't trust a juke-box these days. Put in 50c and get... 50Cents! I don't care what anyone says, that ain't music!)

I'm very sorry to hear your wife is in such need. I can relate. The carer role is much dismissed, but vital in our communities, so you have my respect. My wife is in the same position as you, and I am eternally grateful to her for the 5 years after my accident. The worst is behind us but, putting up with me is no easy ask! My best to your wife.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 5:24 pm 
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Panamint Valley Miner Emeritus

Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 3:00 pm
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Location: Winnemucca, NV
Gravelrash wrote:
I'm very sorry to hear your wife is in such need. I can relate. ... My wife is in the same position as you, and I am eternally grateful to her for the 5 years after my accident. The worst is behind us but, putting up with me is no easy ask! My best to your wife.

Thank you.

My wife, though disabled, still gets around very well. I bought her a new car (the Honda CR-V on my Jarbidge fire page) last October and it's already got nearly 35,000 miles on it ... :?

She worked for 21 years at the borax plants in Trona and several board members here who works/worked there knew her very well and she gained the respect of most who worked with her. She put many of the guys to shame with her stamina and determination to work hard. Severe osteoarthritis has finally taken its toll and she's had numerous surgeries the past decade to replace this, that and the other.

_________________
D.A. Wright
~When You Live in Nevada, "just down the road" is anywhere in the line of sight within the curvature of the earth.


Last edited by D.A. Wright on Sat Oct 27, 2007 5:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 5:27 pm 
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Location: Winnemucca, NV
D.A. Wright wrote:
I bet Graham C., my buddy from Australia, would love to accompany you, as he mentioned to me that my trip to Jarbidge this past summer "got his juices flowing" to head back up there again (Graham and I went in 2001). Graham joined this forum the other day, he's Coopcoyote.

Just after I wrote that, I left the library in Bishop(15 miles north of Big Pine) and ran into Graham. I mentioned that aspect and he seemed pleased with the thought. So maybe you ought to PM him here and send him greetings and an invite.

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D.A. Wright
~When You Live in Nevada, "just down the road" is anywhere in the line of sight within the curvature of the earth.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2007 8:48 pm 
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Another Ballarat Barkeep

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Location: Churchill, Vic, Australia
D.A. Wright wrote:
Just after I wrote that, I left the library in Bishop(15 miles north of Big Pine) and ran into Graham. I mentioned that aspect and he seemed pleased with the thought. So maybe you ought to PM him here and send him greetings and an invite.


As one Barkeep to another, it just seems like the friendly thing to do! :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 07, 2007 4:07 pm 
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Howdy Gravelrash!

Wow, I have been reading your posts and am having fun learning about Australia and the original Ballarat. I notice that you are an ESL teacher? I was also a school teacher for a number of years - very rewarding profession, but exploring the backcountry is even better! Now, just to figure out how to get paid doing it, huh?

I agree with your assessment that this country has much to offer for buffs of the backcountry. There is more to explore than can even be done in a lifetime. The solitude is what I enjoy, being out where the mainstream masses fear to tread, and becoming one with Nature! You are fortunate to have met up with David Wright, for he is exceptionally knowledgeable regarding this entire region. He is also lucky to live right next door in Big Pine.

Well, have to go now, but will look forward to reading more of what's on your mind. See ya' ...

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If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space!

http://oldtrailmaster.wordpress.com (The Death Valley Journal)
http://silentpassage.wordpress.com (Death Valley Tricycle Expedition)
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http://trikeasylum.wordpress.com (for recumbent trike pilots)


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